1. Bring the noise.

     

  2. RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS

    Need to see this

    (Source: vimeo.com)

     

  3.  

  4. rudygodinez:

    Philip Johnson, Research Nuclear Reactor, (1960)

    One of the least known buildings designed by Johnson is his 1960 nuclear reactor in Rehovot, Israel. It is a beautifully composed diagram, a building that seems almost timeless in it’s composition and texture: as much at home in the cities of Mesopotamia as it would be among the monasteries of the middle ages. It consists of a 250 ft. long and 120ft. wide tapered almost solid concrete base and similarly tapered concrete “tomb” that contains the nuclear reactor. The base of this massive “tomb” contains the research laboratories, which are grouped around a spacious court, arcaded in the manner of a medieval monastery. It could easily be mistaken for an abandoned mosque, which is most likely the undeclared intention of the security conscious Israeli authorities. One of Johnson’s strangest and most impressive monuments.

     

  5. magictransistor:

    Maharao Umed Singh of Kota, Hunting at Night (Victoria & Albert Museum), Kota, 1790.

    (via batarde)

     

  6. badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

    Xalapa, Veracruz-Llave

    México

    Summerrrrrrrrrrrrr

    (Source: yosoyaldo)

     

  7. Mont Royal, Montreal. From the archives.

     

  8. Jamie and friend. From the archives.

     

  9. Dusty Maghrebi Art in Moulay Idriss. From the outtakes.

    I snapped this while my travel buddy/roommate/BFF Myles and I attempted to escape the city as the sun went down. Hailing a cab in the Holy City during Ramadan took patience. We looked around, watched the rajouls try to rush every taxi that arrived, and eventually chatted up a shopkeep for a bit. His store had this alcove outside. 

     

  10.  

    Sail Bench | Félix Guyon

    Located in Vercheres, a small village near Montreal, this monument honors the first founders of the village who arrived by wind and water in the region in 1740. Users can then sit on thoses park benches and relive the history of Vercheres in its beginning .

    Done only by people of the village, it also pays tribute to today’s craftsman who perpetuate the art of their ancestors to make good things. White oak used in this project also refers to the wood used by the people of the 18th century for the construction of boats.

    —————————-

    Sailboat benches in MTL. This is everything.

     


  11.  

    Why do we not discuss clouds more?

    image

    I mean look at that. That’s water.

    image

    Flying water.

    image

    FLYING

    image

    FUCKING

    image

    WATER

    LIKE WHAT THE FUCK, WHY DO WE EVER STOP TALKING ABOUT THIS

    WHAT IS THIS

    HOW IS THIS EVEN

    image

    AND NOW THE FLYING WATER IS EATING A MOUNTAIN

    GOD DAMN, WHAT

    (Source: prestonhymas, via monsterstalkingaboutmonsters)

     

  12. Birthday Goth

     

  13. likeafieldmouse:

    Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)

    (via wilsymons)

     

  14. A suspected illegal construction is seen covered by green plants atop a 19-storey residential building in Guangzhou, Guangdong province April 11, 2014. The suspected illegal construction, which takes up an area of about 40 square metres, was built 10 years ago. Local law enforcement department discovered the construction back in 2012, but have failed to find the owner since then, local media reported. 

    (Source: dig-image, via batarde)

     


  15. A survey of ancient and modern amulets throughout the world surprisingly concludes that the image of the open right hand was a universally recognized and employed sign of protection from the early Mesopotamia amulets to the Qat Istar and the Qat Inana, the Mano Pantea, and the right hand of the Buddha in the mudra (gesture) of teaching or proaction, and the Hand of Fatima. The common and universal human experience of the emotions of jealousy and envy, of the dangers of pregnancy and childbirth, to the dependency upon the fertility of crops and herds undergird the reality behind the amulet of the open right hand. Throughout al of those cultures and religious traditions in which we find the open right, particularly as identified with a female personality of great energy and status, was the commonality for its use as protection in the “female” experiences of conception, pregnancy, childbirth, and lactation as well as within the boundaries of the domestic sphere, such as the nurture and care of children, the preparation of food, and so on. Beyond the varied species of stone or metal used to fabricate the amulet, there are functional differences in the use of the proactive open right hand.

    The Qat Istar, also known as the Qat Inana, or Hand of Isthar/Inana, had no textual or scriptural basis among the Akkadians, Sumerians, and Mesopotamians who used it; nevertheless, it had specific meaning as the controller or seizer of diseases(s). Ironically, modern scholarship not only suggests the lack of textual basis for this amulet but also recognizes that the disease(s) from which the wearer of the Qat Istar (or Inana) was protected was classified as psychological of psychosomatic in nature.

    — Diane Apostolos-Cappadona on the Mesopotamian origins of the Hand of Fatima amulet. Published in Beyond The Exotic: Women’s Histories in Islamic Societies by Amira El Azhary Sonbol 
    (via isqineeha)

    (via indigenousdialogues)